Reviews: Classroom management

32 reviews found for "Classroom management"
Book review : A sociology of educating
This is a book review of A sociology of educating edited by Roland Meighan and Clive Harber, published by Continuum in 2007, ISBN 0826481280. It was reviewed by Jonathan Tummons of York College on behalf of ESCalate. This book provides both a thorough introduction to sociology as well as to education as a source of study. The book plunges straight into a number of significant themes (the role of parents in the education of their children; the...
Book review : Captivating your class : effective teaching skills
This is a book review of Captivating your class : effective teaching skills by Joanne Philpott, published by Continuum in 2009, ISBN 9781847062673. It was reviewed by Simon Atkinson of Sijen Education / Massey University, New Zealand on behalf of ESCalate. This book is structured around six sections; Enlivening A level teaching and learning, Creating independent students, Encouraging reflective learners, Extending students thinking, Revision, and...
Book review : Classroom starters and plenaries : creative ideas for use across the classroom
This is a book review of Classroom starters and plenaries : creative ideas for use across the classroom by Kate J. Brown, published by Continuum in 2009, ISBN 9781847065452. It was reviewed by Liane Purnell of Newman University College on behalf of ESCalate. Starters and plenaries are now established elements of good lesson planning. A good starter gets a class engaged right from the word go, challenges and motivates students and sets a positive...
Book review : Creating an inclusive school
This is a book review of Creating an inclusive school by Mal Leicester, published by Network Continuum Education in 2008, ISBN 9781855394544. It was reviewed by Liane Purnell of Newman University College on behalf of ESCalate. This book is a compilation of short articles on a series of given topics around inclusion that are interesting, but not especially helpful, or thought provoking. The lack of references to research and dated references mean...
Book review : First class
This is a book review of First class by John Mower published by the University of Hertfordshire Press in 2008, ISBN 9781902806907. It was reviewed by Natalie Carry of Newman University College on behalf of ESCalate. On initial reading, First Class, appeared to be yet another anecdotal tale of the woeful experiences of a classroom teacher. However, a few more pages in and Mower's insightful story of a newly qualified teacher's (NQT) experiences...
Book review : How to survive your first year in teaching
This is a book review of How to survive your first year in teaching (2nd ed.) by Sue Cowley, published by Continuum in 2008 ISBN 9781847064714. It was reviewed by Liane Purnell of Newman University College, on behalf of ESCalate. This book is divided into 6 parts: ‘getting started’, ‘you and your classroom’, ‘climbing the paper mountain’, ‘it’s all about people’, ‘just part of the job’ and ‘onwards and upwards’. To take just one of these, such...
Book review : Learning to teach in the secondary school
This is a book review of Learning to teach in the secondary school edited by Susan Capel, Marilyn Leask and Tony Turner, published by Routledge in 2009, ISBN 9780415478724. It was reviewed by Liane Purnell of Newman University College, on behalf of ESCalate. This edition has been updated to take account of the move towards Masters (M level) qualifications and covers topics such as, planning lessons and schemes of work, managing behaviour for...
Book review : Promoting effective group work in the primary classroom : a handbook for teachers and practitioners
This is book review of Promoting effective group work in the primary classroom : a handbook for teachers and practitioners by Ed Baines et al., published by Routledge in 2008, ISBN 9780415416870. It was reviewed by Mark Jenkins of the University of Winchester on behalf of ESCalate. The book is the result of a four year study known as the SPRinG project (Social and Pedagogical Research into Group Work). The research was based on pupils in the 5-14...
Book review : Regulatory discourses in education : a Lacanian perspective
While not an easy read, this book provides an excellent introduction to some potential uses of Lacanian psychoanalytic theory – particularly in relation to theoretical explorations of teachers’ relationships to their own senses of professionalism, policy discourses and practitioner research. Anyone with an interest in these areas will find the book thought provoking and an excellent basis for reflexion, discussion and analysis. Through an...
Book review : The really useful literacy book : being creative with literacy in the primary classroom
Feelings that the National Curriculum (NC) and the National Literacy Strategy (NLS) have raised standards in literacy at the expense of creativity in teaching and learning permeate the book. The authors also express a concern that the importance of speaking and listening has been devalued. The authors focus upon key principles of teaching and learning that may guide primary literacy practitioners, and those who teach or support them. Includes...
Book Review: Art Education 11-18 (2nd ed)
This anthology offers ten discursive critiques, which analyse the state of current art design and craft provision in secondary schools. The authors offer diagnoses, identifying curricular shortfalls, and collectively explore strategies for improvement. What this book really says is that we must change our practice. ‘Safe’ is in effect, no longer so, if this subject is to retain credibility. We must also consider how we can most effectively...
Book review: Building classroom success: eliminating academic fear and failure
This is a book review of Building classroom success: eliminating academic fear and failure by Andrew Martin, published by Continuum in 2010, ISBN 9781847065605. It was reviewed by Szerenke Kovacs of ESCalate at the University of Bristol. The book focuses on success, fear and failure in the classroom, and what teachers can do about them. The book is divided into 4 parts and 21 chapters. The author discusses achievement evolution, academic...
Book Review: Doing Academic Writing in Education: Connecting the Personal and the Professional
Taking the specific writing requirements of a range of student writers in education as their focus, Richards and Miller have produced a convincing and informative account of some of the tribulations and triumphs that these student writers encounter. This book convinces because it is so thoroughly rooted in the personal experiences of these writers: the different strands of the book are illustrated with a rich variety of examples, and the...
Book Review: Educational Leadership: Ambiguity, Professionals & Managerialism
This book is an excellent read about management and leadership in schools. The introduction to ‘an ironic orientation’ to explain head teacher and teacher responses to managerialism is enlightening, and I found that the concept of irony grows on you as it is developed and applied throughout the book. This book adds to ‘a growing recognition of the dysfunctions of managerialism’ (pg x) and confirms what other writers have found; namely that...
Book Review: Ethical Leadership and Decision Making in Education: Applying Theoretical Perspectives to Complex Dilemmas (Topics in Educational Leadership S.)
The book comes from three recent developments in the field of educational leadership. Firstly an interest in the study of ethics among educational leaders; secondly a rising tendency to use case studies as a method of reflection on administrative problems; and thirdly the introduction of licensure standards in the US for school leaders that require an understanding of ethical issues. The book is written from within an American context and for an...
Book Review: Every Child Included
The introduction of the Every Child Matters agenda has focussed the attention of schools and education professionals clearly onto the issue of inclusion and inclusive practice. Whilst this has been seen as a positive development there are many unresolved issues, such as what exactly does inclusion mean, who is affected by it and how do we know if we are achieving it? This book clearly states its definition of inclusion and the associated concerns...
Book Review: In Search of Pedagogy (World Library of Educationalists S.) Vol2
The second volume of In Search of Pedagogy comprises a selection of Jerome Bruner’s writings spanning from 1978 to the present. As was the case in volume I, the writings are drawn from research papers, essays, journal articles and chapters from his books during his seventy year career. Readers of this second volume will no doubt recognise how elements of Bruner’s work have influenced current educational policies, particularly at the pre-school...
Book Review: In Search of Pedagogy: v. 1 (World Library of Educationalists S.)
Jerome S. Bruner was born in 1915. Influenced by Jean Piaget and later by Lev Vygotsky, Bruner’s theories of cognitive development informed subsequent understanding of how individuals learn and represented a major shift from the hitherto prevailing behaviourist approaches. His writings on knowledge structure and the development of curricula are based on theory and empirical research and have been highly influential in terms of educational reforms...
Book Review: Innovating in Higher Education: Teaching, Learning and Institutional Cultures
Innovation is, by definition, novel and challenging – not always positive but forcing entities to reconsider ways and means of achieving their goals. It is to be hoped that an investigation of any phenomenon takes account, if not taking on, at least some of the characteristics of the matter under investigation. Sadly, in the present case, the somewhat leaden prose style reflects none of the energy and, indeed, enterprise, shown by innovators in...
Book Review: John Newsom: A Hertfordshire Educationist
Although this book is biographical in nature, it also offers an in depth insight into the complex and occasionally perturbing relationship between compulsory education, local politics, national innovations and global influences. David Parker’s biography of John Newsom ‘a Hertfordshire educationalist’ provides the reader with a useful lens through which to view secondary education within the social and political contexts of the time. The book...
Book Review: Knowledge, Power and Educational Reform
This is an excellent book which provides an insight into the range of different aspects of Bernstein’s legacy of provoking conceptual thinking about knowledge, sociology of education and pedagogic practice. I would strongly recommend the book to both practising teachers and trainees in all areas of education who are looking for research that informs us about language, knowledge and pedagogical principles. It will also appeal to policy based...
Book Review: Learning Journals (2nd Ed)
Although I have some familiarity with the literature of reflective practice, it is not necessary to have any prior understanding about reflection in order to benefit from and enjoy this book. Moon’s writing is coherent and well paced without being overtly ‘academic’, making the book accessible to a wide audience. The structure and page layout is clear and logical, and illustrative examples are used throughout - bringing the text alive and keeping...
Book Review: Models of learning - tools for teaching (2nd Edition)
Joyce et al. seem to set out to provide a book which is ground in the literature, and yet will appeal to classroom teachers as a 'practical' guide. In many ways they succeed. The book has many strengths. It is clearly laid out, and easy on the eye. More significantly it covers a lot of ground, and is mostly very readable. The book provides a great deal of information, and insight, for practitioners; and includes 'coaching guides' for teachers who...
Book Review: Non-western Educational Traditions: Indigenous Approaches to Educational Thought and Practice (Sociocultural, Political & Historical Studies in Education)
I opened Reagan’s new edition of ‘Non-Western Educational Traditions’ eagerly as his second edition (Reagan, 2000) had indicated that a future area of study should be ‘the interaction between traditional forms of educational thought and practice and imposed Western ones’ (p.253 this volume). The last few years have seen a welcome upsurge in indigenous writings on epistemological ethnocentrism which are beginning to give us a rich insight into the...
Book Review: Re-imagining Educational Leadership
This book is an extension of Brian Caldwell’s work on leadership and self-management in schools, and is influenced by Peter Drucker’s concept of ‘abandonment’ whereby organisations critically assess structures to evaluate those which will be useful to meet future challenges and those that should be ‘abandoned’. He illustrates how through the use of ‘new enterprise logic’ educational leaders are becoming re-energised and enthusiastic about the...
Book Review: Re-Thinking Freire: Globalization and the Environmental Crisis (Sociocultural, Political & Historical Studies in Education S.)
This book contains a collection of essays which were originally papers given at a conference in 2000. The conference was organised as an attempt to resist western colonisation in the developing world, and also because of the specific concern that colleges of education in North America promote the liberal thinking that supports the development of a global consumer dependent lifestyle no longer sustainable in the face of the environmental crisis. ...
Book Review: Researching Foundation Degrees. Linking research and practice
Underpinning this book is the idea that foundation degrees (FD) are under-researched and, as an important part of policy, this is a hiatus that needs to be addressed. With this we can all agree. How, for example, did it come about that Labour Party documents on higher education circulated in the late Autumn of 1999 contained no reference to the development of these awards, announced by the Secretary of State in February 2000. His announcement was...
Book Review: Rethinking Schooling (Education Heritage)
The co-authors of Rethinking Schooling describe their work as “An important resource for students of Curriculum Studies.” Reviewing the volume in the persona of one such student I find this to be a legitimate claim. Delving in to the text my senses were immediately aroused as I was immersed in the musty wooden smell and atmosphere of 17th century schoolrooms. Rather amusingly, the author of the first chapter on origins and development of the...
Book Review: Schooling, Society and Curriculum (Foundations and Futures of Education S.)
This is a challenging and thought provoking book. It comprises eleven essays, written by experts in their fields, concerning fundamental issues relating to school curricula. These chapters have emerged from a seminar series, ‘New Directions for Curriculum Studies’ which ran between 2003 and 2005. All those concerned with education in schools will be aware of the continuing current focus on content, standards and delivery of discretely taught...
Book Review: Teaching Citizenship in Schools
This book will be of interest to anyone who is lecturing citizenship education to initial teacher training students. It is clear from the introduction of the book that citizenship is far from being an easy subject to define; indeed it underlines the fact that it has a different emphasis within the English, Scottish and Welsh curriculums. This is, I believe, an interesting starting point making students question what the rationale for the subject...
Book Review: The Human Rights Handbook: A Global Perspective for Education
It would be preferable if this excellent handbook could be rendered totally superfluous to anyone involved in policy relating to human rights and dignity. However the content covers issues that are critical to populations in every part of the world. These vital humanitarian policy areas are placed soundly in a regulatory context with wide reference to associated authorities and interest groups. This is definitely a practical guidebook which is...
Book Review: Tracing Education Policy (Education Heritage S.)
The saying goes ‘there is nothing new under the sun’ and this book proves that to be true in the case of education policy. It examines the key themes that have stimulated discussion and shaped policy since 1975 and traces these through the Thatcher years and into the New Labour regime by selecting relevant articles and responses published in the Oxford Review of Education. The very first article included is an examination of the concept of...